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azuleonyx

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#1
UPDATE(2018-11-05): I have split the reading list into different levels and added any books that I am considering reading there. If someone feels the book are on the wrong page, lets discuss it and we can make sure they fit properly.

To add to the Topic: For anyone looking to get into Forensics...., I have started a reading list on my personal blog. There are many, many references out there and I keep looking at a whole bunch of them. In spirit of the community, I posted my Reading List on my blog. I may go back and create complete reviews if people would like more information. I also have several other books either that I have orders or I have not added (yet) to this list. I read probably 30+ books a year both digital and physical books (not all are technical books).

Another place to find a good list of books is Palo Alto Networks' Cybersecurity Cannon website.
 
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azuleonyx

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#2
Added:

RTFM: Red Team Manual
BTFM: Blue Team Manual
Blue Team Handbook: Incident Response Edition
 

Shift Key

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#3
Hi Azuleonyx.

Great idea on starting this thread. I'm always on the lookout for good books (and also trying to find the time to read them all).

Currently, have not read but on my priority DFIR list are:
  • Investigating Windows Systems, by Harlan Carvey
  • SQLite Forensics, by Paul Sanderson
  • X-Ways Forensics Practitioner’s Guide, by Brett Shavers & Eric Zimmerman

Also, I’m currently reading (but haven’t gotten far enough in to give an opinion on it yet) is
  • Report Writing Handbook for the Computer Forensic Examiner, by Bruce W Pixley

---------------------
On a complete side-note, a couple other books currently reading (but not DFIR / OSINT / or Cyber Security related).
If you are a parent of young kids, recommend:
  • 1-2-3 Magic, by Thomas Phelan (Kinda a weird title with the "magic" bit, but very practical parenting tips).
And just plain interesting:
  • GRIT, by Angela Duckworth. The subtitle is, "The Power of Passion and Perseverance" which basically sums-up what the book is about. Exploring how "grit" is far more powerful than "talent" and a better indicator of future success. Fascinating read, and very interesting concept in relation to the DFIR / OSINT / Cyber Security fields. I think GRIT is the defining characteristic of people who succeed in this line of work. And on one more tangent, Justin Seitz wrote a great blog post on "tenacity" which is a much shorter read than the above book, but also does a great job exploring this concept. Grit, tenacity, passion / perseverance....trying not to lose them with age;)
 

azuleonyx

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#4
No worries, if you want I can directly organize the books directly in the list. From briefly using X-Ways and EnCase, I think X-Ways, to me, appears to be a better suite (cheaper as well).

Let me know about the Report Writing one. It's a bit larger for a handbook/pocket reference being about the same size as my Gray Hat Python book.

I am currently going to read (in no direct order):

Python Digital Forensics Cookbook by Preston Miller and Chapin Bryce
File System Forensic Analysis by Brian Carrier
Real Digital Forensics by Keith J. Jones, Richard Bejtlich, and Curtis W. Rose
Forensic Discovery by Dan Famer and Wietse Venema
 

azuleonyx

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#5
Added:
CCNA Routing and Switching Portable Command Guide (ICND1 100-105, ICND2 200-105, and CCNA 200-125) (4th Edition)
CCNA Routing and Switching 200-125 Official Guide Library (1st Edition)

Why would I add CCNA books? Well, for those doing network forensics and with Cisco basically being the defacto standard for networking, they are good references. Now, I just need to re-certify again. Ha!
 

azuleonyx

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#6
@Shift Key : I've read nearly half of Grit (probably could finish it if I wasn't reading several forensics books!). I realized something. I was deployed to the Middle East earlier this year and I did not make a lot of friends in the shop I worked in. However, the customers I was working for loved me. This lead to a serious issue were I was basically hazed by co-workers for nearly the whole six months which made it horrible.

I realized that my passion and willingness to help others really kept me sane, but because others could not keep up with me, I was outcast-ed. While working, I basically told me this statement: "I solve problems, but if you want a quick patch, ask someone else because I do not do anything fast but to the best of my ability to fix the issue."

Today, I am working on jumping fields from strictly Network Engineer work which I either configure or monitor networks -- no enjoyment though unless I am teaching others -- to forensics for an everyday challenge and hope to solve problems along the way.
 

Shift Key

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#7
@azuleonyx : Wow, you are powering through that book. I hope you liked it.

I think it's great that you stick to your principles, including working to the best of your ability. There always will be some people who take the path of least resistance in regards to their personal lives and their work. And unfortunately, rather than be inspired by people who pursue excellence, they often resent them. I think your mindset and willingness to learn will take you a long way in forensics!
 

azuleonyx

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#8

Lids

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#9
For something a bit cyber-esque, I quite enjoyed this read a few years back: Kingpin - How One Hacker Took Over The Billion Dollar Underground essentially about how "Iceman" - who you end up empathising with by the end of it - started his life by phreaking phone systems and hacking his high school network, then became a security researcher for 0-days whilst simultaneously taking over some of the biggest black markets for fake credit cards. I can't recall how much of it is based on fact and how much is fiction.

Also, @azuleonyx that File System Forensic Analysis by Brian Carrier is a good read - I have a hardcopy somewhere.

I also just stumbled across this where they are giving away copies of books - link provided by thisweekin4n6.com newsletter: DFIR book giveaway
 

azuleonyx

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#10
@Lids : The Kingpin book reminds me of Ghosts in the Wire though written from a 3rd party instead of the actually hacker's point of view.

Fie System Analysis came up in several books that I was reading. I got the Forensics Library off Amazon but only softcover instead of hardback (cheaper).

Umm, I missed that link in the this weekin4n6.com.
 

twicesafe

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#12
@Lids Umm, I missed that link in the this weekin4n6.com.
Brett Shaversb (@bshavers) talks about the book giveaway at:
DFIR Training

He also discusses that if you are a Patreon member, you get an extra 20 chances per month to win the books.
Plus, you get access to all his courses and guides like X-Ways Cheat Sheet which is a great resource for x-ways users.
What is this thing called "Patreon?"

Being a Patreon with DFIR training has a lot of benefits, so I highly recommend it, not only for the material, but also to support Brett who provides a lot to this community including support for this site.
 

Lids

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#13
@Lids : The Kingpin book reminds me of Ghosts in the Wire though written from a 3rd party instead of the actually hacker's point of view.

Fie System Analysis came up in several books that I was reading. I got the Forensics Library off Amazon but only softcover instead of hardback (cheaper).

Umm, I missed that link in the this weekin4n6.com.
@azuleonyx Was Ghosts in the Wire, the Kevin Mitnick book?
 

Lids

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#14
Brett Shaversb (@bshavers) talks about the book giveaway at:
DFIR Training

He also discusses that if you are a Patreon member, you get an extra 20 chances per month to win the books.
Plus, you get access to all his courses and guides like X-Ways Cheat Sheet which is a great resource for x-ways users.
What is this thing called "Patreon?"

Being a Patreon with DFIR training has a lot of benefits, so I highly recommend it, not only for the material, but also to support Brett who provides a lot to this community including support for this site.
@twicesafe : How are the courses on there?
 

azuleonyx

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#15

twicesafe

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#16
@twicesafe : How are the courses on there?
I have only had a chance to browse them so far, but they look really good. Especially considering Brett's depth of knowledge, you know you are going to get the essential elements and not 'fluff'. Once I have a chance to go through them, I plan to do a quick Blog post with review.

The X-Ways Cheat Sheet has been great too in making sure we have it setup properly within our office so that we can properly take advantage of the high performance computers we have for digital forensics work.

Supporting Brett (@bshavers) , Harlan Carvey, Phill (@Randomaccess) and the many others that provide so much to this community is also great to be a part of.
 

azuleonyx

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#19
Yes, with the funny quote about it not being a pipe but only an image of one. It does reflect digital forensics though.
 

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